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What happens if you don't book reservations if it says ''recommended seat reservation''?

  • 19 May 2022
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Hello! I have a question about recommended seat reservations. I understand that it is not required, but what happens if I don't book a seat? Is there a chance that I'm not going to be allowed on a train or is it a matter of finding an actual sitting place? Essentially, I'm asking whether not booking a seat creates a risk of missing the train or is it simply a risk of standing instead of sitting?

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Best answer by seewulf 19 May 2022, 19:12

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Hello! I have a question about recommended seat reservations. I understand that it is not required, but what happens if I don't book a seat? Is there a chance that I'm not going to be allowed on a train or is it a matter of finding an actual sitting place? Essentially, I'm asking whether not booking a seat creates a risk of missing the train or is it simply a risk of standing instead of sitting?

Usually you risk without a reservation to stand your journey on the train.
However if a train is really crowded (happens on Fridays, Mondays/Sundays from time to time in Germany and since the new “Klimaticket” even in Austri) all passengers without a reservation can be forced to leave the train.

General example

100% of a train are all seats
If the train is filled up to 150% (all seats occupied + half standing)  the Train staff in Germany have to ask passengers without reservation to leave the train :/ If not enough leave the train they ask the Secruity or Police to assist and force more passengers to leave the train.

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As such not really that much different from PKP in PL. I watched some overcrowded Poszpiesny coming FROm WAW on FRI-eve a week or 2 ago whilst I sat in a KM train from Modlin.

As sebas already tells: unitll now I´ve only heard of such things in DE and AT-and mostly on days that anyone who is from EUR can know its superbusy=long weekends etc (USAers etc tend not to know that as they have quite different days off). 

BUT then in my country (NL, I live near Haga, the city with nearly 100.000 polski/lietuvo people) there are also reports of trains being cleared and cancelled-which thus only leads to even more overcrowding on the next train= over 15/20 mins.

I these countries in zachodnie EUR it is common for nearly all trainlines to run at least ev. hour or even more-a thing that PKP could perhaps also strive to get.

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