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A train connection is both "included" and "reservation needed". What?


 

When checking trains, some are “included” and some have a cost for reservation. However, also in the ones that are “included”, it says “seat reservations required”. I am confused. Do I need a reservation for an “included” connection. 

I have a first class global pass. 

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Best answer by AnnaB 11 May 2022, 15:41

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Userlevel 7
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I guess "Included” means included in the pass network, which is something else than reservation required or not.

By the way, this train should not have mandatory reservations since it's a regional train. Swedish timetable data is known to have too many trains with "mandatory reservations” mentioned. This train is 2nd class only.

Should you decide to book a reservation, that's best done via sj.se, where you don't pay a booking fee.

Edit: on second thought, it shouldn't say "Included” if there's a mandatory reservation. Maybe the issue with requiring mandatory reservations where it's not required has only been solved half.

Userlevel 7
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The train departing Stockholm at 16.15 is Snälltåget, which has a mandatory reservation fee. 

For travels in Sweden the reservation are only mandatory on high speed trains (SJ snabbtåg), night trains and Snälltåget.

The best way to make a reservation in Sweden if you need is at sj.se.

In order to make your reservation there you need your pass cover number. If you have a mobile pass you need to get your pass cover number from customer support.

Thanks for your replies, so for trains that are not Snabbtåg, Night train or Snälltåg I can rely on my pass only… 

It’s very confusing, because as far as I know, the other trains there (that are not “included” and have red colour) are included in the Global pass anyway. But it looks like these in fact are night trains, HST/snabbtåg - so I guess the colour tells me if the reservation is mandatory or not. 

Userlevel 7
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There is a list showing which railway companies that are included in the different countries. 

https://www.interrail.eu/en/plan-your-trip/trains-europe/railway-companies

There are 3 companies on the route between Stockholm and Göteborg, SJ, MTR and Flixtrain. Only SJ is included in the pass.

Around Stockholm there is SL and Mälartåg, which not are included. On some routes there are both SJ trains and trains from SL or Mälartåg.

Userlevel 7
Badge +5

Terveto--suomenlainen.

A better site then to use is likely bahn.de (or .com)-this is german railways and its even reaches further in trains as the app. This site always shows very clearly what the actual operator is and if a REServ is needed=mandatory or not.

Snabbtag are the X2000 trains=semi-hi-speed.

SNäll taget is a private company that runs overnight trains to Deutschland via Danmark, to Hamburg and Berlin

Note that there is-but I think only from STO to Göteborge also 2 others that do not take passes; FLIX (=low cost, just as their green buses, not yet in FI) and MTR.

Local trains in SE are run by many different companies on contract to the province=Läner, and often do not even show who runs them-except in tiny letters somewhere hidden. They show the name of the local xxx Trafiken. A bit like in the big HEL area.

Thank you, kiitos, tusen tack! Even though the Snälltåget is not included, it says on the interrail site that you can use discount code INTERRAIL. With that code, a night train from Stockholm to Berlin would cost around 500 SEK in a couchette or 250 SEK with a seat reservation. So I would say it’s kind of included, that can’t be the normal price? 

However, that particular train seems to be extremely fully booked… 

I am looking for the best / fastest way to get to mainland Europe from Finland, without spending too much time in Sweden or Denmark (sorry!). Night train straight to Berlin would be ideal - the other way to go seems to be to Malmö and then Copenhagen and onwards. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +6

Thank you, kiitos, tusen tack! Even though the Snälltåget is not included, it says on the interrail site that you can use discount code INTERRAIL. With that code, a night train from Stockholm to Berlin would cost around 500 SEK in a couchette or 250 SEK with a seat reservation. So I would say it’s kind of included, that can’t be the normal price? 

However, that particular train seems to be extremely fully booked… 

I am looking for the best / fastest way to get to mainland Europe from Finland, without spending too much time in Sweden or Denmark (sorry!). Night train straight to Berlin would be ideal - the other way to go seems to be to Malmö and then Copenhagen and onwards. 

 

Snälltåget is included and you pay 199 SEK for a seat in reservation fee. You enter the INTERRAIL in the field Promotion code. A couchett with Snälltåget is 399-499 SEK from Stockholm to Germany.

https://www.snalltaget.se/en

Taking the discounted ferry to Stockholm and then Snälltåget to Germany must be the fastest way for you to start your journey in Europe. 

 

By the way, the “discounted” ferry is a joke. When you enter the code “interrail” on the ferry company site, you get a higher price (Tallink-Silja). Also compared to Viking club members (free membership) it’s a lot more expensive with this “discount”. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +13

By the way, the “discounted” ferry is a joke. When you enter the code “interrail” on the ferry company site, you get a higher price (Tallink-Silja). Also compared to Viking club members (free membership) it’s a lot more expensive with this “discount”. 

The discount applies for the Standardfares and not the cheap advance fares of the ferry companies. 

Another example is the Nightjets (Nighttrains of austrian rail) sometimes a Saver Fare called “ SparSchiene” is cheaper as a Travelday value of your Interrailpass/Eurailpass  + the reservation. 

By the way, the “discounted” ferry is a joke. When you enter the code “interrail” on the ferry company site, you get a higher price (Tallink-Silja). Also compared to Viking club members (free membership) it’s a lot more expensive with this “discount”. 

The discount applies for the Standardfares and not the cheap advance fares of the ferry companies. 

Another example is the Nightjets (Nighttrains of austrian rail) sometimes a Saver Fare called “ SparSchiene” is cheaper as a Travelday value of your Interrailpass/Eurailpass  + the reservation. 

 

Yes… BUT I think it’s still a bit off, when 15 euros are added to the price when you enter the discount code. I understand that from some prices, you don’t get a discount. But having to pay more than literally anyone else is a bit disturbing. 

Userlevel 7
Badge +13

By the way, the “discounted” ferry is a joke. When you enter the code “interrail” on the ferry company site, you get a higher price (Tallink-Silja). Also compared to Viking club members (free membership) it’s a lot more expensive with this “discount”. 

The discount applies for the Standardfares and not the cheap advance fares of the ferry companies. 

Another example is the Nightjets (Nighttrains of austrian rail) sometimes a Saver Fare called “ SparSchiene” is cheaper as a Travelday value of your Interrailpass/Eurailpass  + the reservation. 

 

Yes… BUT I think it’s still a bit off, when 15 euros are added to the price when you enter the discount code. I understand that from some prices, you don’t get a discount. But having to pay more than literally anyone else is a bit disturbing. 

Thats why iam checking first the “public” fares and afterwards the fare with interrail or any other reduction card. 

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